Politiken Cup 2009

This year I decided to make a serious change in my summer schedule and instead of playing “my favourite” Biel Open I took part in famous Danish open. This time it was a successful attempt and I shared first place with Indian Grandmaster Negi with unexpectedly high score of 8.5 out of 10.

I should say that organization was on very high level, especially for open tournament. A private car was waiting for us when we landed in Copenhagen Airport and our trip to the place, where the tournament was held took us only 40 minutes. The place is called “Lo-Skollen” and it’s mostly used for different kind of meetings and conferences. In general the place is ideal for playing chess with nice green nature around the complex. You can have a nice walking before and after the game.

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You can even eat some fresh fruits during the walk

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After 10 minutes you can get close to the Baltic Sea

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All the meals you have inside the complex, as well as you can have a free cofee and tea 24 hours. The playing hall has very interesting structure : first 12 boards has been played in the main room , which I should say looked very nice and was comfortable for everybody players and spectators ( big screens with live coverage). Not every close tournament has such a good conditions.

The tournament field was quite strong for open tournament. We had one 2700+ player Vladimir Malakhov, I was seeded number 7 behind such a strong players like: Peter Heine Nielsen, Sergey Tiviakov, Gabriel Sargissian, Alexey Dreev and Evgeny Postny. There were also all the best players from Sweden, Norway and of course Denmark.

First round was quite easy for me. I won very convincing game against Hansen (one of many :))

1 round

Black’s  last move  26…g5 was a huge error. After 27 Ne4 Qf4 28 Qf4 he resigned not waiting for a nice mate in two after 28…gf 29. Nf6 followed by 30.Nf7.

In  second round I faced Swedish player Vanman Kent. The game was more competative than the first one, we were both short of time when we reached the following position:

round 2

Black has obvious positional edge, but White seems pretty solid. I managed to discover a nice manoeuvre 26…Re3! 27.Kg1 Rb3 my rook became very active and the game was decided in a few moves.

I was slightly worried about third round, since we played two games in one day and second one always promises tough struggle. My opponent was German Fide Master Mattias Bach. Already in the opening he suprised me with interesting exchange sacrifice

3 round

13 fe Qe7 Black has got interesting compensation for the exchange. During the game it was obvious to me that my opponent followed his home preparation, that he recognized immediately after the end of the game. The line actually has been suggested in my book, so he rightly guessed that I can choose this line. In the middlegame my opponent missed some good opportunities and game transfered to favourable endgame for me, that was converted to a full point not without mistakes.

In round four my opponent was Danish International Master Antonsen. The game saw a thematical complicated Grunfeld middlegame. I managed to outplay my opponent but in mutual timetrouble I missed a few easy wins. After we passed the mark of 40 moves Black still was clearly better, but his 43.Bg3

round 4

Allowed an elegant finish: 43…e2! 44.Re1 fg3 45.Qe5 hg 46.Qh2 Qd4+ and in view of 47…Rh7 my opponent resigned.

Round number five. Here comes the worse game of the tournament. My opponent Jonny Hector suprised me in the opening with very rare line in Slav:

round 5

After 11…f6 Black usually opts for long castle and chooses either 12…Nc5, or 12…Be6. 12 …0-0-0 came as a big suprise to me and no wonder , since this move occured very rarely on practice. My reaction was quite natural 13.Qc1 removing the queen from d-file, but he quickly reacted with interesting pawn sacrifice 13…Nc5 14.Be5 fe5 15.Qe3 Nb3! 16.Rad1 Bc5 and indeed he got a reliable compensation for the pawn. The idea to play 19.Nc4 followed by 20.Na3 was very poor, but I didn’t realized this during the game. In the following diagrammround 5(2)

my opponent found very strong idea  20…Nd2 21.Rfe1 Rf8! 22.e3 Bg4 23. Rc1 Ba3 24.ba3 Nf3 25.Bf3 Bf3 and has got a clear plus. Still it was possible to defend much more stubborn, but being already short of time I lost without much resistance.

Before the next round I was speaking with my close friend by telephone and he said me that I should play careful and draw might be a good result with Black pieces after such a painful loss. I couldn’t even imagine how right he was. My opponent was Swedish International Master Berg Claus. In the opening I decided to opt for the line of my childhood and telling the truth I was not really updated with the latest theory. In the following position

round 6

He suprised me with positionally sound  12.g4 !? Later I discovered a serious amount of games in my Database. Black has no choice and should play 12…f5 13.g5 Nf7. The critical moment appeared  on move 16th

round 6(2)

Every normal player would have captured with rook without much hesitation, while I decided to play original and recaptured with knight intending to continue with Be6 and Nc6 . Unfortunately this move is a big error, since I simply missed  17.Nb5! , which creates a very unpleasant threat of 18.Nc7 followed by 19.Ba7 . Black’s position appears to be critical, but somehow I managed to survive after my opponent comitted a mistake in mutual timetrouble.

In round seven I played against Danish player Skytte. He tried to suprise me already on move 2! choosing Budapesht Gambit, but I was pretty familiar with this opening, as recently I worked on this Gambit for my book. The middlegame saw quite interesting battle, that ended in my favour with extra pawn. The tecchnical part was very convincing I believe.

Round 8. My opponent was the member of Danish national Team from Dresden Olympiad- Rasmussen A. I rightly quessed that he will go for fashionable line in Breyer, that has been played by Anand in Amber tournament. I was studying intensively this position before the game, but I am not sure that my play in the opening was good enough. The critical moment arised after 21…ed4 , instead of recapturing my central pawn with knight my opponent played inaccurate 22.cb5

round 7

That allowed nice tactical touch 22…d3! and after 23.Bd3 cb5 Black remained with extra pawn. Later I played very bad and managed to win this game only due to my opponent’s blunder in the following position:

round 8

Here instead of 38 Bb2 , that should make an easy draw, my opponent commited desicive mistake by playing 38.Bd2? after 38…Ra7! Black is winning due to the weakness of White’s first rank.

In round 9 I played against young Norway young Grandmaster Ludvig Hammer. It looks like the opening was a suprise for him and he has spent a big amount of time, nevertheless he played very good moves (as later I discovered he followed the play of Vaganian). I didn’t manage to pose him any problems and he equalised comfortably, while I catched him on time.  We both were very short of time and in the following position

round 9

I wanted to play 28. Re1, but then I discovered that after 28…Re6! it’s not easy to discover a decent move for me, when I was shocked to see my time expired with 3,2 and 1 seconds and indeed it’s unbelievable how I managed to play 28.Nd6 without losing on time. It looks like my opponent was even more shocked and after two moves he blundered an elegant tactical blow

round 9(2)

The last move he captured my pawn on c5, but this appeared to be a decisive mistake, as after 30.Nb7! Nb7 31.Qc6 Black’s position appears to be losing , as he cannot deal with misplaced position of his knight and weakness of his last rank together. It was really a shocking game and of course I will remember the moment when I managed to make my move with 1 second remaining for a long time:).

Last round gave me a great chance to fight for the tournament victory. I played with White against Russian Vladimir Malakhov the player with 2707 rating , who was leading through all the tournament, but somehow the round before he made a quick draw with White pieces against Indian Negi, that suprised me a lot, as it was obvious that in the last round he will face the player, who will try to fight for a win. It was a score of 2,5-0,5 in his favour before our game, but all the games he played with White pieces, so I was full of energy to take a revenge and to improve the overall score. Undoubtefully this was my best game in the tournament. There was everything important opening , interesting middlegame and finally very nice finish. In a few days I would like to publish this game fully commented here.

Scoring + 7 out of 10 appears to be unsufficient for the victory in the tournament. I shared first place , but the winner of the tournament was claimed Inidian Negi, who played an extraordinary tournament. He also missed good winning chances against Postny and Sargissian respectively. Certainly I was very satisfied with my final result and especially with last game win!

The final standings of the Politiken Cup you can see here : http://www.ksu.dk/politiken_cup/turnering/stilling.aspx?tur_id=627&aar=2009&aar=2009

FIDE Rating list July 2009

Two days ago FIDE published a new rating list for the 1st of July. If I understand correctly now they change the system and next rating list suppose to appear in two months and from this point every two months we will get a new rating list. Not a bad system in my opinion. The most remarkable think is  that 2635 would have been enough to be in the top 100 last time, now this mark has risen to 2641 and this allowed me to stay in top 100  :).  Here is the full list of first 100.

Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 2813 10 1975
2 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2788 2 1969
3 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2772 12 1990
4 Aronian, Levon g ARM 2768 13 1982
5 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 2760 15 1983
6 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2759 0 1975
7 Leko, Peter g HUN 2756 13 1979
8 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 2756 0 1987
9 Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2755 27 1968
10 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2751 0 1977
11 Gashimov, Vugar g AZE 2740 9 1986
12 Svidler, Peter g RUS 2739 36 1976
13 Wang, Yue g CHN 2736 10 1987
14 Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 2733 20 1983
15 Shirov, Alexei g ESP 2732 38 1972
16 Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 2727 3 1983
17 Bacrot, Etienne g FRA 2721 32 1983
18 Kamsky, Gata g USA 2717 22 1974
19 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 2717 17 1985
20 Karjakin, Sergey g UKR 2717 13 1990
21 Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 2716 44 1983
22 Movsesian, Sergei g SVK 2716 31 1978
23 Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 2716 10 1983
24 Alekseev, Evgeny g RUS 2714 20 1985
25 Akopian, Vladimir g ARM 2712 13 1971
26 Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2710 35 1987
27 Motylev, Alexander g RUS 2710 16 1979
28 Malakhov, Vladimir g RUS 2707 7 1980
29 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 2703 31 1990
30 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2703 30 1969
31 Rublevsky, Sergei g RUS 2703 16 1974
32 Bu, Xiangzhi g CHN 2702 11 1985
33 Ni, Hua g CHN 2701 17 1983
34 Onischuk, Alexander g USA 2699 34 1975
35 Adams, Michael g ENG 2699 7 1971
36 Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 2697 41 1985
37 Miroshnichenko, Evgenij g UKR 2696 29 1978
38 Vallejo Pons, Francisco g ESP 2693 7 1982
39 Wang, Hao g CHN 2690 38 1989
40 Bologan, Viktor g MDA 2689 12 1971
41 Tomashevsky, Evgeny g RUS 2689 6 1987
42 Navara, David g CZE 2687 19 1985
43 Polgar, Judit g HUN 2687 1 1976
44 Short, Nigel D g ENG 2684 14 1965
45 Jobava, Baadur g GEO 2684 2 1983
46 Almasi, Zoltan g HUN 2684 1 1976
47 Moiseenko, Alexander g UKR 2682 9 1980
48 Timofeev, Artyom g RUS 2681 7 1985
49 Vitiugov, Nikita g RUS 2681 6 1987
50 Nielsen, Peter Heine g DEN 2680 17 1973
51 Harikrishna, P. g IND 2679 24 1986
52 Volokitin, Andrei g UKR 2678 14 1986
53 Cheparinov, Ivan g BUL 2678 0 1986
54 Sutovsky, Emil g ISR 2675 27 1977
55 Inarkiev, Ernesto g RUS 2675 15 1985
56 Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter g ROU 2675 10 1976
57 Tiviakov, Sergei g NED 2674 34 1973
58 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam g UZB 2672 29 1979
59 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 2670 25 1992
60 Grachev, Boris g RUS 2669 19 1986
61 Sasikiran, Krishnan g IND 2669 18 1981
62 Kurnosov, Igor g RUS 2669 13 1985
63 Fressinet, Laurent g FRA 2667 28 1981
64 Sargissian, Gabriel g ARM 2667 18 1983
65 Fridman, Daniel g GER 2665 23 1976
66 Guseinov, Gadir g AZE 2664 9 1986
67 Najer, Evgeniy g RUS 2663 26 1977
68 Beliavsky, Alexander G g SLO 2662 23 1953
69 Dreev, Alexey g RUS 2660 15 1969
70 Milov, Vadim g SUI 2659 2 1972
71 Roiz, Michael g ISR 2658 31 1983
72 Meier, Georg g GER 2658 21 1987
73 Socko, Bartosz g POL 2656 30 1978
74 Fedorchuk, Sergey A. g UKR 2655 41 1981
75 Landa, Konstantin g RUS 2655 33 1972
76 Van Wely, Loek g NED 2655 33 1972
77 Sokolov, Ivan g BIH 2655 32 1968
78 Efimenko, Zahar g UKR 2654 30 1985
79 Tregubov, Pavel V. g RUS 2652 30 1971
80 Areshchenko, Alexander g UKR 2651 40 1986
81 Tkachiev, Vladislav g FRA 2650 17 1973
82 Smirin, Ilia g ISR 2650 15 1968
83 Savchenko, Boris g RUS 2650 12 1986
84 Pashikian, Arman g ARM 2650 2 1987
85 Shulman, Yuri g USA 2648 34 1975
86 Andreikin, Dmitry g RUS 2648 20 1990
87 Lastin, Alexander g RUS 2648 16 1976
88 Postny, Evgeny g ISR 2647 33 1981
89 Granda Zuniga, Julio E g PER 2647 26 1967
90 Berkes, Ferenc g HUN 2647 20 1985
91 Riazantsev, Alexander g RUS 2647 16 1985
92 So, Wesley g PHI 2646 22 1993
93 Seirawan, Yasser g USA 2646 4 1960
94 Georgiev, Kiril g BUL 2645 18 1965
95 Kobalia, Mikhail g RUS 2645 0 1978
96 Mamedov, Rauf g AZE 2645 0 1988
97 Predojevic, Borki g BIH 2644 30 1987
98 Karpov, Anatoly g RUS 2644 0 1951
99 Amonatov, Farrukh g TJK 2641 24 1978
100 Avrukh, Boris g ISR 2641 13 1978

Richard Riordan Chess Festival

Only a few days ago I found that our Chess Festival during the 18th Maccabiah is called in honor of Richard Riordan. Here is some interesting inormation about the main sponsor of Chess event.

In 1981, successful lawyer, businessman, hi-tech investor and venture 
capitalist Richard Riordan created the Foundation that bears his name. 
His simple goal: enable people to acquire skills necessary to compete 
successfully in society. He had an equally simple plan: teach children 
to read and write at an early age, and nurture leadership skills in 
young adults. The Riordan Foundation has an impressive record of 
computer-based, early childhood literacy programs across America and 
youth development and leadership programs with over 2,400 graduates. 
Its signature Rx for Reading programs have distributed over 25,500 
computers to over 2,140 schools in 40 states and provided funds for 
over 172,000 books purchased for elementary schools.

Richard Riordan won a decisive election victory in Los Angeles in 
1993, and quickly became one of the most successful and admired of big 
city mayors in the USA. He won a second term by a landslide in 1997, 
and had he not himself imposed the consecutive-terms limit, he would 
undoubtedly have been Mayor after 2001. For 8 years, he accepted a 
salary of exactly $1 per year. In 2003, he was the natural choice to 
serve as California Secretary of Education in Governor 
Schwarzenegger's first cabinet.

It will not surprise any Chess player to learn that Richard Riordan, 
the confirmed believer in the power of early education, is also
a lifelong aficionado of Chess and a friend of many leading players. 
When his advisor and friend Steve Soboroff formed the Los Angeles 
Committee of 18, Richard Riordan was moved to sponsor the 18th 
Maccabiah Chess Festival in recognition of Maccabi World Union's 
encouragement of young chess players in many countries.

The Richard Riordan Chess Festival (Israel, July 12-23 2009) includes:

A super-tournament (12 participants, average rating 2656, rapid and blitz)
Three festive sinultaneous displays by Boris Gelfand, Judit Polgar and 
Pavel Eljanov
A round-robin GM tournament and 2 IM tournaments
Open and Youth tournaments
Further attractions such as open blitz, and for the first time in 
Israel, underwater blitz!

Presentation of the players and additional information for the 18th Maccabiah

SUPER-TOURNAMENT – PARTICIPANTS

GM Boris Gelfand, Israel

Born 1968, April 2009 FIDE rating 2733

Boris was born in Belarus. He began playing chess at age 4 and at 11 he was already a Candidate Master. He improved his chess skills under the coaching of Kapengut. After winning the 1985 USSR Junior championship, he decided to devote his life to professional chess. In 1987/88 he won the European Junior Championship and shared first place with Ivanchuk, Serper, and Lautier in the World Junior. At his first participation in the USSR Championship in 1989 he finished second. In the following years he has participated in Candidates’ matches for the World Title, beating Nikolic, Adams, and Kramnik.

He has won or shared 1st place in Norilsk 1987, Vilnius 1988, Manila (interzonal) 1990, Wijk aan Zee 1992, Moscow 1992, Biel 1993, Vienna 1993, Tilburg 1993, Cap D’agde rapid 1994 and 2002, Polanica Zdroj 1998 and 2000, Amber rapid 2001 and 2002, Cannes 2002, Pamplona 2004, Ashdod 2004, Bermuda 2005 and Biel 2005.

In 2007 he won matches against Kasimdzhanov and Kamsky to qualify for the WCC 2007. A few months later, in Mexico, he shared 2-3 place with Kramnik in the World Championship tournament. In 2008 he led the the Israeli national team to their historic silver medal in the Dresden Olympiad, while collecting a silver medal for the second best performance at the first board. Recently his rating went over 2750 after some strong performances and in May 2009 he won the prestigious ACP Rapid World Cup in Odessa, defeating Peter Svidler 3:1 in the final.

GM Judit Polgar, Hungary

Born 1976, April 2009 FIDE rating 2693

The strongest ever female in the history of chess. Judit is the youngest of the three famous sisters who took the chess world by storm during the 1980s. From her childhood she participated solely in men’s events, The exception being the Women Chess Olympiad where she brought Hungary the gold medal in 1988 and 1990. She became WGM at age 12 and GM at age 15 (1991). In the same year she won the Hungarian Championship.

With her enterprising style Judit has defeated almost all the leading chess-players in the world. She won or shared first in Hastings II 1988-1989, Amsterdam II 1990, Hastings 1993, Madrid 1994, Leon 1996, US Open 1998, Hoogeveen 1999, Siegman 1999, Japfa 2000, Najdorf Memorial 2000. In 2005 she reached her best rating of 2725 and participated in the World Championship tournament in San-Luis. She has beaten former world champion Boris Spassky in a match.

GM Pavel Eljanov, Ukraine

Born 1983, April 2009 FIDE rating 2693

Pavel received the Grandmaster title in 2000. He has also graduated in Law. He won or shared 1st place in the following tournaments: Polanica Zdroj 2000, Amsterdam 2005, Biel Open 2004, Montreal Empresa 2006, Wijk aan Zee II 2007. He was equal third in the European Individual Championship 2004. As a member of the Ukrainian team he won gold in the 2004 Olympiad and the World Team U20 (2000). His father Viktor is also an International Master. In 2007 Pavel worked as a second of Boris Gelfand in the World Championship tournament. His highest rating was 2720 in 2008.

GM Evgeny Najer, Russia

Born 1977, April 2009 FIDE rating 2669

As a junior Evgeny won the Russian championships under 16 and under 20. Since then he has acheived the GM title, winning or sharing first in the following tournaments: Moscow GM 1996, Pardubice 1996, Moscow Championship 1997 and 2003, St Petersburg 2000, Korinthos Open 2001, US Open 2002, National Open 2004, Moscow Open 2007, World Open 2007, World Open (USA) 2008 and President Cup (AZE) in 2008. In 2005 he won the main tournament of the Maccabiah Games, and now he is coming back to defend his title. His highest rating was 2677 in 2006.

GM Emil Sutovsky, Israel

Born 1977, April 2009 FIDE rating 2660

Emil was born in Azerbaidjan. He started playing chess when he was five, immediately showing great talent. He moved to Israel in 1991 and in the next few years he had great results in junior events, culminating in winning the World Junior in 1996. He has been coached by GM Alon Greenfeld for many years, while winning or sharing first in the following tournaments: Hoogoven VAM 1997, Buenos Aires 1997, Essen 1999, Hastings 2000, Isle of Man 1998 and 1999, Gibraltar and Aeroflot Open in 2005 and Ashdod Open 2006. Emil was a member of the Israeli national team from 1996 till 2007 and of the Ashdod team who won the Israeli League from 2007 to 2009. Since 2007 he has been coaching Gata Kamsky. Emil’s extremely sharp chess style has helped him to create many beautiful games. His other interest include singing (Emil is a prolific bass-baritone, who has performed in a number of concerts) and trivia games (In 2005 he shared 1-3 places in Israeli trivia championship). His highest rating was 2694 in 2004.

GM Boris Avrukh, Israel

Born 1978, April 2009 FIDE rating 2647

Boris was born in Kazakhstan, where he became world champion under-12 in 1990. He moved to Israel in 1995. In 1998 he received the GM title and made his debut for the Israeli national team. In the 2000 Olympiad he won the gold medal for the best performance on Board 6. He has been a member of the teams who finished second in the European Team Ch. 2003 and 2005 and the 2008 Olympiad.

Boris shared 1st place in the Israeli championship 2000 and 2002, and has won many Israeli League titles with both Beer-Sheva and Ashdod. Other successes included: Antwerp Open 1999, Paris Ch. 1997 and 1999, Beersheba 1996. Andorra Open 2001, Biel Open 2001, 2004 and 2006, Kavala Open 2003 and Benidorm 2008.

In 2008 he again shared first place in the Israeli championship, and was declared the champion after tie-break. At about the same time his first book was published: a 450-page treatise on the 1.d4 d5 openings including many of his own novelties. His best rating was 2657 in 2008.

GM Daniel Fridman, Germany

Born 1976, April 2009 FIDE rating 2646

Daniel was born in Latvia. He became a Grandmaster in 2001. Earlier he won bronze in the World championship U16 in 1992, 4th in the World junior in 1996 and won the Latvian championship in 1996. He has won or shared first in the following events: Herfort Open 2000, Bermuda Open 2003, National Open 2004, German Open Championship 2005, Marseilles Open 2006, LGA Nuremberg, Karl Marma Memorial (GER) 2006 and Liverpool Open 2007. He is currently a member of the German national team. His best rating was 2650 in 2009.

GM Ilia Smirin, Israel

Born 1968, April 2009 FIDE rating 2641

Ilia was born in Belarus and immigrated to Israel in 1991. He won the Israeli championship in 1992 and 1999, and shared first in 2008. Ilia represented Israel in  successive Olympiads from 1994 to 2006. He is a member of the Ashdod team who won 3 Israeli League titles from 2007-2009. Over the years he had numerous successes, including winning or sharing first in Sverdlovsk 1987, Saltsiobaden and Daugavplis 1989, Gausdal 1990, Komotini and Tel Aviv 1992, New York Open 2000, Burgas 1994, Las Palmas 1993, Olso 1994 and Vienna Open 1994, Las Vegas 1997 and Paris Open 1997, Los Angeles 2000, Croatia Zonal and US Continental Open 2000, Dos Hermanas and World Open 2001, Foxwood Open and Biel 2002, World Open and Foxwood Open in 2003 and in 2006, Ashdod International 2004, Acropolis 2007 and was also 2nd at Biel 2003. His best rating was 2702 in 2001.

GM Alexander Beliavsky, Slovenia

Born 1953, April 2009 FIDE rating 2640

Alexander was born in Ukraine. Since 1995 he has been a Slovenian citizen. His first notable achievement was winning the Word Junior Championship in 1973. A year later he became USSR champion for the first time. He repeated this feat three more times: 1980, 1987, 1990. In 1982 he qualified for the candidates matches. Unfortunately he was paired against the future winner Garry Kasparov, and thus was eliminated in the first round. Meanwhile he won or shared first in numerous international competitions, including Alicante 1978, Bucharest 1980, Tashkent 1980, Tilburg 1981 (a very strong event where he finished ahead of several past and future world champions), Sarajevo 1982, Minsk 1983, Wijk aan Zee 1984, Tilburg 1986 (ahead of Karpov), Sochi 1986, Amsterdam 1989, Munich 1990, Belgrade 1993, Leon 1994, Bern 1995.

Alexander has won several Olympic gold medals with the USSR team. In Thessaloniki 1984 he was promoted to Board 1, as Karpov and Kasparov were busy with their world championship match, and he scored a superb 8/10 to guarantee another win for the Soviet team. His uncompromising style always attracts great interest of the spectators, as Beliavsky always struggles until the “last bullet”, to use the words of Salo Flohr.

In 1995 he decided to switch federation to Slovenia, won the national championship there and represented his new country in every Olynpiad since then. His more recent results included victories in Polanica Zdroj 1996, Frankfurt open 1997, Vidmar Memorial 1999, 2001, 2003 and 2005, Pula Zonal 2000 and Ljubljana 2002. He has also been a regular participant at the FIDE knockout world cup. His highest rating was 2710 in 1997.

GM Michael Roiz, Israel

Born 1983, April 2009 FIDE rating 2635

Michael was born in Russia and moved to Israel as a youth. He immediately joined the Beer-Sheva club, for which he has played ever since, winning several League championships. Michael has a quiet style with a sound positional basis. Accordingly his chess progress was gradual but nevertheless impressive. He became a Grandmaster in 2003. He shared first place in Ashdod 2004, Zurich 2004, Basel 2006, Isle of Man 2007. His finest performance was in Valjevo 2007, where he beat the great Anatoly Karpov to win the tournament outright.

Recently he has been a key member of the Israeli national team: In 2007 he was awarded a bronze medal for the third best performance at the  European Team Championship; In 2008 he was undefeated on Board 2 as Israel won silver in the Dresden Olympiad. In the same year he achieved his highest rating to date: 2680.

GM Maxim Rodshtein, Israel

Born 1989, April 2009 FIDE rating 2627

The youngest participant in the tournament. Maxim was born in Russia, where he was already considered a big talent. He moved to Israel as a child and has since won every possible Junior title. His big time career started when he won the 2006 Israeli Championship. The following year he won 1st in Andorra and Beer-Sheva (rapid) and his rating shot past 2600.

In the 2008 Olympiad he played on Board 5 and made a big score, helping Israel to win a historic silver medal. In particular he was responsible for Israel’s win against the Olympic champion, Armenia. A few months later he was offered by Armenia’s No. 1 Levon Aronian to work with him as a second. Maxim shared 1st in the 2008 Israeli championship, but didn’t retain the title due to inferior tie-break. His highest rating to date is 2650 (January 2009).

GM Vitali Golod, Israel

Born 1971, April 2009 FIDE rating 2587

Vitali was born in Ukraine, where he became U16 Champion in 1987, U20 champion in 1988, and  Ukrainian Champion in 1992. Meanwhile he graduated in Physical Culture and Sport.

In 1995 he immigrated to Israel, where he has played for the Beer-Sheva and Ashdod clubs, winning numerous Israeli League titles. Recently he has been the captain of the Israeli women team.

Vitali has won or shared first in the following events: Iraklion 1993, Bratislava 1993, Skoda Open 1993, Rishon le Zion 1997, Vlissingen 2000, Beer Sheva 2002, Zurich 2003, Saint Vincent 2004, Santa Monica 2004, Dake Memorial 2004, Basel 2006 and Isle of Man Open 2007. His best rating was 2606 in 2008.

THREE FESTIVE SIMULTANEOUS DISPLAYS
On July 15, 2009

The three highest rated participants of the chess Super-Tournament, 
which takes place at Blue-Bay Hotel, Netanya, between July 12-14 
(rapid) and then on July 16 (rapid and closing ceremony), will give 
simultaneous displays around the country on Wednesday, July 15.

The main event will take place at Tel-Nof military base, of the IDF 
Air Force. Beginning at 15:00, the No. 1 woman in the world, JUDIT 
POLGAR will face the IDF Air Force!
Earlier the Air Force championship is going to take place, with the 
top 30 finishers eligible to play against Judit.
During the morning hours of July 15, there will be a guided tour of
Tel-Nof base for Maccabiah participants.

At 17:00 will start in the Jerusalem Town Hall a simultaneous display 
by BORIS GELFAND against celebrities and reporters.
The registration for this display is organized by Alon Cohen-Revivo, 
manager of JeruChess club. The number of players is limited to 30. The 
general public is hereby invited to attend the event!
Anyone who wishes to play against Gelfand may contact Alon
Tel: 052-2688666 E-mail: jeruchess@gmail.com

And at 20:00 will start in the Netanya amphitheater by the beach, a 
simultaneous display by PAVEL ELJANOV against celebrities and the 
general public.
The registration for this display is organized by Nick Kopaloff, 
manager of the Netanya Chess club. The number of players is limited to 
30. The general public is hereby invited to attend the event!
Anyone who wishes to play against Eljanov may contact Nick
Tel: 052-3572157 E-mail: kishka@netvision.net.il.

The 18th Maccabiah Games

The 18th Maccabiah Games will be held on July 12-23, 2009.

HeaderImage

Thanks to the efforts of  Moshe Slav threre is a great chess festival , which includes 4 tournaments.  I will take part in the Super-Tournament that features such a players like Boris Gelfand (Israel), Judit Polgar (Hungary), Pavel Eljanov (Ukraine), Evgeniy Najer (Russia), Alexander Beliavsky (Slovenia).

For more information you can visit official site of chess Festival http://mchess.co.il/

1991

1991 was a remarkable year for me , after winning World Championship under 12 in 1990 I have spent a lot of time in Moscow playing in many chess events. Actually the reason for that was a rich guy , who wanted to support my chess career ( I even don’t remember his name :)). It was very short period until he dissapeared, but in 1991 I was able to take part in two memorable events.

First it was “Pre-Olympiad blitz ” in Moscow “House of Journalists”. It was round robin tournament where I played two games against respectively Kasparov, Tal, Smyslov, Beliavsky, Bareev, Dolmatov and Vyzmanavin. 3 last players together with Kasparov participated successfully in Chess Olympiad in 1992 playing for Soviet Union team.

I scored 4,5 points out of 14 games, but it was  not bad taking into account my age :). I shared last place with Beliavsky, but the biggest memory from  the tournament is my draw against Kasparov. Actually I was absolutely winning in the middle ( he overlooked nice trick and lost piece) , as well as in the final position, but I was very unexperienced and was afraid to lose on time, since it was first time I played with “Garde” chess clocks and it was hard for me to evaluate how much time I have ( actually starting from 3 min you have a feeling that your flag should drop every second).

Kasparov-29

Even the second game, that he managed to win was a big fight and , that I can be proud of.

In a few days my ” sposnsor” orginized a firendly blitz match against Mikhail Tal .

Tal

I remember I arrived together my uncle to one of the Moscow Hospitals and we played 13 games in his ward. He looked very bad ( but it was already for a few years) and as always he smoked one cigarette after another, but anyway the atmosphere was very friendly and he was joking all the time. I wouldn’t say he played not seriously, but he was very relaxed and this allowed me to win the match 8-5 . He was still great blitz player , as a few days before during “Pre-Olympiad” blitz he won a sensational game against Kasparov.

I remember in the end he promised me to come Germany, where in two weeks I supposed to participate in World Championship under 14. Unfortunately this didn’t happen, because one week after our match  Mikhail Tal passed to another World.

I can proudly claim , that I was the last, who played against great Mikhail Tal!

Actually a few days ago I discovered  notes with these games. Here I would like to give the text:

[Event “Pre Olymiad blitz”]

[Site “?”]

[Date “1991.??.??”]

[Round “?”]

[White “Avrukh, B.”]

[Black “Kasparov, G.”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[ECO “E71”]

[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]

[PlyCount “84”]

[EventDate “2006.04.23”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. h3 O-O 6. Bg5 c5 7. d5 b5 8. cxb5 a6

9. a4 axb5 10. Bxb5 Ba6 11. Nge2 Qb6 12. O-O Bxb5 13. axb5 Nbd7 14. Be3 Qb7 15.

f4 Rxa1 16. Qxa1 Ra8 17. Qd1 Nb6 18. Qb3 Ne8 19. Kh1 Qd7 20. Ng3 Nc7 21. Re1

Ra5 22. Bd2 Nxb5 23. e5 Nxc3 24. Qxb6 Rb5 25. Qa6 Nxd5 26. Qa8+ Bf8 27. Qxd5 e6

28. Qd3 d5 29. Ne4 Be7 30. Nf6+ Bxf6 31. exf6 Rxb2 32. Bc3 Rb3 33. Qc2 c4 34.

Be5 Qb7 35. Ra1 h5 36. Qa2 Kh7 37. Qa8 Qxa8 38. Rxa8 c3 39. Rc8 h4 40. Rxc3

Rb1+ 41. Kh2 g5 42. fxg5 Kg6 {…..} 1/2-1/2

[Event “Pre Olymiad blitz”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1991.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Kasparov, G.”]
[Black “Avrukh, B.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “E92”]
[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]
[PlyCount “80”]
[EventDate “2006.04.23”]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. Be3 h6 8. O-O
Ng4 9. Bc1 Nc6 10. d5 Ne7 11. Nd2 h5 12. h3 Nh6 13. c5 f5 14. cxd6 cxd6 15.
exf5 Nexf5 16. Nde4 Nf7 17. Bd3 Bd7 18. a4 Rc8 19. Bb5 Nd4 20. Bxd7 Qxd7 21.
Be3 Qf5 22. f3 Qd7 23. Bf2 a6 24. Qd3 Kh8 25. a5 Nf5 26. Rac1 h4 27. Rc2 Qd8
28. b4 Qc7 29. Rfc1 Qc4 30. Qxc4 Rxc4 31. Na2 Rxc2 32. Rxc2 Nd8 33. Rc7 Rf7 34.
Rc8 Rf8 35. Kf1 Ne6 36. Rxf8+ Nxf8 37. Nac3 Nd7 38. Na4 Kg8 39. Ke2 Bh6 40. Kd3
Kf7 {….} 1-0
[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1991.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Tal, M.”]
[Black “Avrukh, B.”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “B38”]
[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]
[PlyCount “52”]
[EventDate “2006.04.23”]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f4 O-O 6. Nf3 c5 7. Be2 cxd4 8. Nxd4
Nc6 9. Be3 Bd7 10. O-O Nxd4 11. Bxd4 Bc6 12. Bf3 Rc8 13. Qd3 Qa5 14. Kh1 a6 15.
b3 b5 16. e5 dxe5 17. fxe5 bxc4 18. bxc4 Nd7 19. e6 Ne5 20. exf7+ Rxf7 21. Bxe5
Qxe5 22. Bxc6 Rxc6 23. Rxf7 Kxf7 24. Rf1+ Rf6 25. Rxf6+ Qxf6 26. Ne2 $4 Qf1+
0-1
[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1991.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Tal, M.”]
[Black “Avrukh, B.”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[ECO “B40”]
[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]
[PlyCount “41”]
[EventDate “2006.04.23”]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. b3 Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. Bb2 Nc6 6. c4 Nc7 7. Bd3 Be7 8. Qe2
O-O 9. Nc3 d5 10. exd6 Qxd6 11. h4 f5 12. Nb5 Nxb5 13. cxb5 Nd4 14. Bxd4 cxd4
15. g4 Bf6 16. Rc1 e5 17. gxf5 e4 18. Bxe4 Re8 19. d3 Bxf5 20. Nd2 Qf4 21. Rc5
{….} 1/2-1/2
[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1991.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Avrukh, B.”]
[Black “Tal, M.”]
[Result “1-0”]
[ECO “E70”]
[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]
[PlyCount “45”]
[EventDate “2006.04.23”]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 O-O 5. Be2 c6 6. h4 d5 7. e5 Ne4 8. h5 c5
9. hxg6 cxd4 10. gxh7+ {One of the games I tried} (10. gxf7+ Rxf7 11. Qxd4 Nxf2
12. Rh5 Nc6 13. Qxd5 Qb6 14. Nf3 Nb4 15. Qd2 Qg6 {and after a hard fight I
lost the game.}) 10… Kh8 11. Qxd4 Nc6 12. Qxd5 Nxc3 13. bxc3 Bxe5 14. Bd2 Qb6
15. Nf3 Bf6 16. Ng5 Be6 17. Nxe6 fxe6 18. Qxe6 Rad8 19. Rd1 Rxd2 20. Kxd2 Qb2+
21. Ke1 Bxc3+ 22. Kf1 Bd4 23. f3 {….} 1-0
[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]
[Site “?”]
[Date “1991.??.??”]
[Round “?”]
[White “Tal, M.”]
[Black “Avrukh, B.”]
[Result “0-1”]
[ECO “E73”]
[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]
[PlyCount “36”]
[EventDate “2006.04.23”]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. g4 c5 7. g5 Nfd7 8. d5 a6
9. h4 b5 10. h5 Ne5 11. cxb5 axb5 12. Bxb5 c4 13. Kf1 Ba6 14. Bxa6 Nxa6 15. Be3
Nd3 16. hxg6 fxg6 17. Qg4 Rf7 18. Kg2 Rb8 {….} 0-1

[Event “Pre Olymiad blitz”]

[Site “?”]

[Date “1991.??.??”]

[Round “?”]

[White “Kasparov, G.”]

[Black “Avrukh, B.”]

[Result “1-0”]

[ECO “E92”]

[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]

[PlyCount “80”]

[EventDate “2006.04.23”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. Be3 h6 8. O-O

Ng4 9. Bc1 Nc6 10. d5 Ne7 11. Nd2 h5 12. h3 Nh6 13. c5 f5 14. cxd6 cxd6 15.

exf5 Nexf5 16. Nde4 Nf7 17. Bd3 Bd7 18. a4 Rc8 19. Bb5 Nd4 20. Bxd7 Qxd7 21.

Be3 Qf5 22. f3 Qd7 23. Bf2 a6 24. Qd3 Kh8 25. a5 Nf5 26. Rac1 h4 27. Rc2 Qd8

28. b4 Qc7 29. Rfc1 Qc4 30. Qxc4 Rxc4 31. Na2 Rxc2 32. Rxc2 Nd8 33. Rc7 Rf7 34.

Rc8 Rf8 35. Kf1 Ne6 36. Rxf8+ Nxf8 37. Nac3 Nd7 38. Na4 Kg8 39. Ke2 Bh6 40. Kd3

Kf7 {….} 1-0

[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]

[Site “?”]

[Date “1991.??.??”]

[Round “?”]

[White “Tal, M.”]

[Black “Avrukh, B.”]

[Result “0-1”]

[ECO “B38”]

[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]

[PlyCount “52”]

[EventDate “2006.04.23”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f4 O-O 6. Nf3 c5 7. Be2 cxd4 8. Nxd4

Nc6 9. Be3 Bd7 10. O-O Nxd4 11. Bxd4 Bc6 12. Bf3 Rc8 13. Qd3 Qa5 14. Kh1 a6 15.

b3 b5 16. e5 dxe5 17. fxe5 bxc4 18. bxc4 Nd7 19. e6 Ne5 20. exf7+ Rxf7 21. Bxe5

Qxe5 22. Bxc6 Rxc6 23. Rxf7 Kxf7 24. Rf1+ Rf6 25. Rxf6+ Qxf6 26. Ne2 $4 Qf1+

0-1

[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]

[Site “?”]

[Date “1991.??.??”]

[Round “?”]

[White “Tal, M.”]

[Black “Avrukh, B.”]

[Result “1/2-1/2”]

[ECO “B40”]

[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]

[PlyCount “41”]

[EventDate “2006.04.23”]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. b3 Nf6 4. e5 Nd5 5. Bb2 Nc6 6. c4 Nc7 7. Bd3 Be7 8. Qe2

O-O 9. Nc3 d5 10. exd6 Qxd6 11. h4 f5 12. Nb5 Nxb5 13. cxb5 Nd4 14. Bxd4 cxd4

15. g4 Bf6 16. Rc1 e5 17. gxf5 e4 18. Bxe4 Re8 19. d3 Bxf5 20. Nd2 Qf4 21. Rc5

{….} 1/2-1/2

[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]

[Site “?”]

[Date “1991.??.??”]

[Round “?”]

[White “Avrukh, B.”]

[Black “Tal, M.”]

[Result “1-0”]

[ECO “E70”]

[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]

[PlyCount “45”]

[EventDate “2006.04.23”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 O-O 5. Be2 c6 6. h4 d5 7. e5 Ne4 8. h5 c5

9. hxg6 cxd4 10. gxh7+ {One of the games I tried} (10. gxf7+ Rxf7 11. Qxd4 Nxf2

12. Rh5 Nc6 13. Qxd5 Qb6 14. Nf3 Nb4 15. Qd2 Qg6 {and after a hard fight I

lost the game.}) 10… Kh8 11. Qxd4 Nc6 12. Qxd5 Nxc3 13. bxc3 Bxe5 14. Bd2 Qb6

15. Nf3 Bf6 16. Ng5 Be6 17. Nxe6 fxe6 18. Qxe6 Rad8 19. Rd1 Rxd2 20. Kxd2 Qb2+

21. Ke1 Bxc3+ 22. Kf1 Bd4 23. f3 {….} 1-0

[Event “Friendly blitz in Moscow”]

[Site “?”]

[Date “1991.??.??”]

[Round “?”]

[White “Tal, M.”]

[Black “Avrukh, B.”]

[Result “0-1”]

[ECO “E73”]

[Annotator “Avrukh,B”]

[PlyCount “36”]

[EventDate “2006.04.23”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be2 O-O 6. g4 c5 7. g5 Nfd7 8. d5 a6

9. h4 b5 10. h5 Ne5 11. cxb5 axb5 12. Bxb5 c4 13. Kf1 Ba6 14. Bxa6 Nxa6 15. Be3

Nd3 16. hxg6 fxg6 17. Qg4 Rf7 18. Kg2 Rb8 {….} 0-1

Once again I would to remind for those , who is interested to open the games in chessbase format. First copy the games to “Notepad” then you save the file put the file type -all files and write  for example Boris.pgn

This file can be opened in ChessBase.

Tel Aviv Port

I was pleasantly suprise to see a “new look” of Tel-Aviv Port. I believe last time I visited the place was 6 years ago:).  Probably it’s  the most charming place in Tel-Aviv with huge choice of Restaurants , Shops and Cafe, as well as fantastic playgrounds for the children. And all this within a few meters distance from the Sea.

Here is a nice link http://www.namal.co.il/Site/en/pages/homePage.asp

where you have English and Hebrew versions. Enjoy:).